The Latest

Oct 21, 2014 / 64 notes
irodohieru:

Ahh I know it’s late but forgot to upload this outfit. ~ ♪ Twin buns and cat pins, everything except the dress is from Taobao - which is from Sheinside. 
Oct 20, 2014 / 1,041 notes

irodohieru:

Ahh I know it’s late but forgot to upload this outfit. ~ ♪ 
Twin buns and cat pins, everything except the dress is from Taobao - which is from Sheinside

(via meronpan-fashion)

Oct 19, 2014 / 5,401 notes
fuckyeahfashioncouture:

Alberta Ferretti Spring-Summer 2015
MFW
Oct 18, 2014 / 1,741 notes

fuckyeahfashioncouture:

Alberta Ferretti Spring-Summer 2015

MFW

(via kammartinez)

what-do-i-wear:

Marni Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear
Oct 17, 2014 / 9 notes

what-do-i-wear:

Marni Spring 2015 Ready-to-Wear

hellogritti:

"Peacock Blue" for Back2Back Milano Design Week 2014


It’s a shoe! :D
Oct 16, 2014 / 2,116 notes

hellogritti:

"Peacock Blue" for Back2Back Milano Design Week 2014

It’s a shoe! :D

(via kammartinez)

Oct 15, 2014 / 153 notes

sagansense:

Between the 22nd-26th weeks of embryonic development, a significant feature begins to develop amidst the formation of the mammalian nervous system (spine, peripheral nerves and brain), teeth, and epidermis (hair, scales, feathers, hooves, and nails).

I’m referring to the ectoderm: one of the three primary main germ cell layers which accompany the mesoderm and endoderm. Feel free to research these other layers yourself (credit to Russian biologist Heinz Christian Pander for their discovery); however, my main focus is on the ecto (outer) derm (skin) layer due to the advantageous and most noticed - yet, overlooked (pun intended) - biological developments in which we tend to highlight (and notice) most often amongst the human species….

image

…eyelashes.

Just as whiskers function on a fox, cat, or mouse, for example, eyelashes trigger a reflex stimulus upon being touched, providing a warning to the brain which closes the eye. It’s pretty amazing that something so seemingly simple like eyelashes are connected through the same neural network - the neuroectoderm - responsible for the development of the brain.

image

Take a tour via The Virtual Human Embro

In terms of evolutionary development and biological purpose for which eyelashes serve, there’s really no mystery: they assist in keeping debris out of our eyes so as to not have our vision impaired (the last thing you want when you’re out for a stroll or grazing at the local watering hole is to be blinded by dust, dander or water, rendering you incapable of spotting the approaching lion…).

Now that we’re up to speed on what eyelashes are, what they do, how they function, and why they are necessary for our survival, let’s get down to some FASHION SCIENCE: THE APPLICATION AND PHYSICS OF MASCARA.

You know those heat-resistant tiles aerospace engineers apply to the outside of a spacecraft so that the astronauts aren’t cooked at over 2,300 degrees?

image

When you’re reentering the Earth’s atmosphere at 17,000 mph, these little guys deflect and absorb radiation. (Wiki)

Those thermal tiles are made of the same Organosilicon compounds as mascara!

Sounds cool, right? But what ABOUT mascara? How does it work? Shelby Kimbrough of Beautylish enlists Jenny Frankel, former cosmetics formulator, beauty engineering consultant (yes, that’s a thing) and president at Frankly Beauty, Inc., to discuss this precise subject in her article "Anatomy of a Beauty Product: Mascara"

image

There are two main types of mascara: cream and waterproof. Cream mascaras are made up of waxes and polymers mixed (but not dissolved) in water. Waterproof versions, on the other hand, contain many of the same ingredients mixed in a non-aqueous solvent, such as dimethicone or acrylate copolymer. Since waterproof mascaras don’t contain water, they won’t dissolve in it (remember “like dissolves like” from high school science class?). This lets them stay put through tears, swimming, and uber-romantic kissing in the rain (yep, we have waterproof mascara to thank for Audrey Hepburn’s amazing lashes in the final scene of Breakfast at Tiffany’s—well, and probably falsies, too.)

image

Structural agents like beeswax, cellulose polymers, and carnauba (palm) wax are what give mascara its body and firmness, while emollients like butylene glycol, glycerin, and dimethicone (a silicone polymer with a “slippery” feel) keep it soft and flexible, so it won’t flake off during the day. Emulsifiers—glyceryl stearate is a common one—are also used to keep the ingredients from separating.

And let’s not forget about pigments. These are typically added in the form of carbon black or iron oxides, although colored mascaras often contain synthetic ultramarines, which range in color from deep-blue to violet and pink. Pigment concentrations range from as low as 0.5% for a really natural look to as high as 10% for midnight-black lashes.

image

image

image

image

The Last Word

Most mascaras contain preservatives that help prevent microbial contamination. While the antimicrobial properties are good—they keep mascara fresh for up to three months and prevent eye infections—some brands use relatively noxious preservatives like parabens, or worse, thimerosal (we recommend steering clear of this mercury-based preservative!). There are a few products on the market that are preservative-free or use natural preservatives like grapefruit seed extract and citric acid.

So there you have it. But wait…what about the application part? It just so happens that Nicki Zevola at FutureDerm provides a wonderful overview on just that…

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

Alright, everyone…nothing more to it than to do it….

image

Stay curious, and keep your #iOnFashion ;)

(via kammartinez)

Oct 14, 2014 / 852 notes

fashionsfromhistory:

Wedding Dress

1927

United States

(via kammartinez)

Oct 13, 2014 / 969 notes
Oct 12, 2014 / 104,865 notes
Oct 11, 2014 / 1,163 notes

(via eireainn)

Oct 10, 2014 / 10,277 notes

(via kammartinez)

Oct 9, 2014 / 1,363 notes
streetsnapfashion:

src:@
Oct 8, 2014 / 212 notes
what-do-i-wear:

LOUIS VUITTON Earring
Oct 7, 2014 / 1,418 notes

what-do-i-wear:

LOUIS VUITTON Earring